Sita in the Triangle

Hey, Carolina readers, Nina Paley’s fascinating animated feature, Sita Sings the Blues (my review), will be playing at the Galaxy Theater in Cary this week for a series of afternoon screenings.  Sita is one of the freshest, funniest, and bluesiest movies to come out in a long time.  Bonus: you’ll be supporting a talented independent filmmaker and a great local theater, too.

7 Comments »

  1. MovieMan0283 Said,

    July 11, 2009 @ 9:25 pm

    Chuck, I have included your titles on a master list of the books bloggers mentioned when responding to “Reading the Movies.” The link is here:

    http://thedancingimage.blogspot.com/2009/07/movie-bookshelf.html

    I have also commented on your own entries.

  2. Chuck Said,

    July 11, 2009 @ 10:06 pm

    Cool, thanks for the linkage. The meme was a very cool idea, and I can imagine writing a much different list if I were to do it again. I also really like the idea of a virtual film bookshelf.

  3. the triangle | Fooner Said,

    July 13, 2009 @ 6:08 am

    [...] Sita in the TriangleHey, Carolina readers, Nina Paley’s fascinating animated feature, Sita Sings the Blues (my review), will be playing at the Galaxy Theater in Cary this week for a series of afternoon screenings. Sita is one of the freshest, funniest, …Read More [...]

  4. GB Said,

    July 23, 2009 @ 1:29 pm

    Nina is awesome. Buy the DVD too!

  5. Chuck Said,

    July 23, 2009 @ 1:32 pm

    I have, and I’ll be evangelizing for her again this fall when I teach Sita in one or more of my classes.

  6. Rob Rushing Said,

    July 27, 2009 @ 11:34 am

    We just watched Sita a few weeks ago, and liked it a lot—but didn’t quite love it. The animation is absolutely beautiful, and the multiple styles show a truly innovative visual imagination. But everyone noted afterwards that, amazingly, it’s the musical sequences that are slightly flat. The animation slows down along with the level of on-screen activity—sure, there are some clever moments, but almost nothing as good as the three Indians telling and re-telling Sita’s story or stories, or even Nina’s own story. Very much worth seeing, but musical numbers always represent the chance to go completely mad, and here they felt… restrained.

  7. Chuck Said,

    July 27, 2009 @ 12:19 pm

    Interesting point. I watched the film alone, so didn’t get to discuss it, but in retrospect, I think you’re right that the musical numbers are less lively. I was probably drawn to the film mots because of the celebrating as a creative act and one filled with fabrications, embellishments, and laughter. The degree to which the storytellers somehow seem outside of time was also compelling.

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